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   -> Volume 5, Issue 7


Course: UCLA short courses on communications
 
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bgooding@unex.ucla.edu (Goodin, Bill)
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PostPosted: Thu Sep 05, 1996 1:17 am    
Subject: Course: UCLA short courses on communications
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#6 Course: UCLA short courses on communications

Three short courses on communications with Bernard Sklar and Frederick
Harris at UCLA.

On November 18-22, 1996, UCLA Extension will present the short course,
"Communication Systems Using Digital Signal Processing", on the UCLA
campus in Los Angeles.

The instructors are Bernard Sklar, PhD, Communications Engineering
Services, and frederick harris, MS, Professor, Electrical and Computer
Engineering, San Diego State University.

As part of the course materials, each participant receives a copy of
the text, "Digital Communications: Fundamentals and Applications", by
Bernard Sklar.

This course provides comprehensive coverage of advanced digital
communications. It differs from other communications courses in its
emphasis on applying modern digital signal processing techniques to
the implementation of communication systems. This makes the course
essential for practitioners in the rapidly changing field.
Error-correction coding, spread spectrum techniques, and
bandwidth-efficient signaling are all discussed in detail. Basic
digital signaling methods and the newest modulation-with-memory
techniques are presented, along with trellis-coded modulation.

The course fee is $1495, which includes the text and extensive course
notes. These course materials are for participants only, and are not
for sale.

On December 2-3, 1996, UCLA Extension will present the short course,
"Advanced Digital Communications: The Search for Efficient Signaling
Methods", on the UCLA campus in Los Angeles.

The instructor is Bernard Sklar, PhD, Communications Engineering Services.

The approach taken in this course is quite different than in a basic
course.

Here, we begin with some system requirements and understand how to
make reasonable design choices. The requirements then drive us toward
the selection of some candidate systems.

The course reviews system subtleties in transforming from data-bits to
channel-bits to symbols to chips; it also reviews the Viterbi decoding
algorithm. Other important topics include trellis-coded modulation,
power- and bandwidth-efficient signaling, and spread spectrum
signaling. The course emphasizes fading channels and how to mitigate
the effects of fading, with specific examples of how various mobile
systems have been designed to withstand fading. These systems include
the Viterbi equalizer in the Global System for Mobile Communication
(GSM) and the Rake receiver in CDMA (IS-95). The course also examines
the recently discovered Turbo codes, whose error-correcting
performance is close to the Shannon limit.

The course fee is $895, which includes the text and extensive course
notes. These materials are for participants only, and are not for
sale.

On December 4-6, 1996, UCLA Extension will present the short course,
"Multirate Digital Filters and Applications", on the UCLA campus in Los
Angeles.

The instructor is Professor Frederick Harris, Electrical and Computer
Engineering, San Diego State University.

This course is an introduction to multirate digital filters, which are
variants of non-recursive filters, and incorporate one or more
resamplers in the signal path. These embedded resamplers affect
changes in sample rate for upsampling, downsampling, or combinations
of both. Changes in sampling rate as part of the signal processing is
a feature unique to sampled data systems. and has no counterpart in
continuous signal processing. Benefits include reduced cost for a
given signal processing task and improved levels of performance for a
given computational burden. This economy of computation has become an
essential requirement of modern communication systems, particularly
battery-operated equipment.

Specific course topics include: Introduction to sample rate
conversion, Non-recursive (finite impulse response) filters, Prototype
FIR filter design methods, Decimation and interpolation, Multirate
filters, Two-channel filter banks, M-channel filter banks,
Proportional bandwidth filter banks and wavelet analysis, Polyphase
recursive all-pass filter banks, Multirate filter applications.

The course fee is $1195, which includes extensive course materials.
These materials are for participants only, and are not for sale.

For additional information and complete course descriptions, please
contact Marcus Hennessy at:

(310) 825-1047
(310) 206-2815 fax
mhenness@unex.ucla.edu
http://www.unex.ucla.edu/shortcourses/

These courses may also be presented on-site at company locations.
All times are GMT + 1 Hour
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